Innovation

Innovation for Human Capability Development

Human Capability Development
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In certain well-known theories of distributive justice, fairness, and equality, such as John Rawls’s, individuals’ access to essential goods is examined in terms of their share of those items. Philosopher and Nobel laureate in economics Amartya Sen says that what really matters is what goods enable us to accomplish and be and the kinds of lives they allow us to have. Providing a laptop or other piece of technology to everyone would not be enough, according to Sen. There is a big difference between people with literacy and those who have access to a steady power source when it comes to making the most of technology. As a result, Sen12’s work has been referred to as the capacity approach, which emphasizes the importance of human skills. Few studies have been done to examine the link between capacity and technical growth, despite its widespread usage in development theory. It’s amazing, really, when you think about it, how much technology is supposed to improve human skills. The capabilities approach is being used as a guide for this project’s technical innovation and engineering design. As part of this research, we are focusing on the poor and disadvantaged in developing nations’ bottom of the pyramid (BoP). An illustration of the ideas being presented is provided by the usage of these three engineering fields: ICT, healthcare/medical technology, and sustainable human settlement.

A growing role for technology in human capacities may be seen when technology improves and is used more extensively in our lives. On the other hand, the link between technology and human capabilities is less definite (Fernandez-Baldor et al. 2014). When the same technology is used by different people, some people may benefit from it, while others may suffer from it. The social contexts in which technology is created and produced made accessibly, and utilized, as well as any inherent affordances in the technical item itself, establish the technologically mediated capabilities (Hutchby 2001; Matthewman 2011). In order to draw generalizations about a technology’s capabilities and impacts, the larger sociotechnical context in which the technology exists must be considered (Oosterlaken 2011). Human capacities are examined in connection to digital design and manufacturing technologies as they are arranged sociotechnically in the UK maker spaces.

We utilize and expand on current theoretical discoveries in the understanding of technology’s contribution to human capacities in our empirical research of makerspaces. On the other hand, our primary contribution to this study is methodological. Methodologies for assessing human capacities have been developed because of the widespread availability of technology in sociotechnical setups that are both stable and moveable. With the Q technique, we provide a framework for analyzing the myriad ways in which technology users encounter capabilities on a daily basis. A theoretical conclusion regarding the link between collective activity and structural change and practical availability of future capabilities in the actual world may be drawn from the differences in capabilities accessible to make space users.

Using a range of digital design and fabrication technologies (DFTs), a maker space teaches individuals how to build, hack, and repair their own goods. A number of labels are used to identify the origins, purposes, and institutional links of manufacturing spaces. Here are a few samples to get you started.

In certain well-known theories of distributive justice, fairness, and equality, such as John Rawls’s, individuals’ access to essential goods is examined in terms of their share of those items. Philosopher and Nobel laureate in economics Amartya Sen says that what really matters is what goods enable us to accomplish and be and the kinds of lives they allow us to have. Providing a laptop or other piece of technology to everyone would not be enough, according to Sen. There is a big difference between people with literacy and those who have access to a steady power source when it comes to making the most of technology. It is Sen’s “capability approach” that stresses the relevance of human functioning and capacities in Sen’s research. Few studies have been done to examine the link between capacity and technical growth, despite its widespread usage in development theory. It’s amazing, really, when you think about it, how much technology is supposed to improve human skills. The capabilities approach is being used as a guide for this project’s technical innovation and engineering design. Innovation for the poor in developing nations, often known as the “Base of the Pyramid” portion of the population, serves as the application setting for this endeavor (BoP). An illustration of the ideas being presented is provided by the usage of these three engineering fields: ICT, healthcare/medical technology, and sustainable human settlement.

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